A Problem I’ve Been Having

I’ve become so intertwined with my work.

I guess this is good. The stuff is just me. The problem is its so me that I’m protective of it. I don’t want anyone to know.

Perhaps, however, if they did know the stories of the work, it would help them to appreciate said work. A title provides context, but is it enough? Do my titles need to be more revealing? Do my descriptions need to be more in-depth?

Or can I provide a hint and a little bit of context and rely on you to enjoy it anyway?

yel

 

Everything I Know About Him

(2013)

spent matches, collected circles, text on trace, war used binoculars, rusted soap dish.

 

Do I have to tell you who ‘him’ is and what it is I know?

This is what I’m struggling with right now.

 

Betrayal of a Typewriter

 VS.

Technology is making a strong argument against my manual Imperial typewriter at the moment.

I’ve had the idea in my head for a while to make a shirt out of typed text. The problem with this is that with a typewriter having set margins, I’ve been having to make the pattern in panels. This obstructs the look of the piece a little.

Yesterday I had a crit. My tutor suggested, “why don’t you just print out multiples?”.

“Well because… because I want to stay true to my materials… and well… because… oh that sounds difficult… and because…”

the dream‘the dream’

I muttered nothings for a few moments and then realised as lovely as the idea of me hand typing the whole shirt is, I’d be so much more productive if i sped up the process with more advanced technology. And technically I’ve still typed the original text that got copied. That counts, right? …Right?

It counts. I’ve come to terms with it now. By scanning in one printed panel and multiplying it on photoshop then printing it on the large scale art school printers, I can do 3 weeks worth of typing in an hour. So I can make more art. I believe this is what they call a ‘win-win situation’.

the reality‘the reality’

 

20 Bananas Laid to Rest

 

relics22

 

The end of the banana project, and my submission into Relics of Attachment Part II.

“20 Bananas Put To Rest

Rachael Disbury’s work surrounds the themes of obsessive sentimentality. The artist has spent four months trying to preserve a banana peel. This piece shows the end of the project. It is up to the viewer if the artist was successful in her attempt. “

 

Relics of Attachment Part II Preview

Thursday evening saw the opening of Relics Of Attachment Part II. Yes, it was Valentines Day, and oh how romantic it was. We couldn’t have asked for a better turn out. The event was a huge success and we are very grateful to the 28 artists that took part and everyone else that was involved in this project.relics7

Cooper Gallery Project Space

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The preview ran from 5 til 7 and was heavily attended. We have received very positive feedback about the exhibition which runs until the 2nd of March.

       relics12     relics19     relics10

 

Our friends and fellow artists have been a great help in this process. Harriette baked brownies for the occasion, and a group of my old friends made a surprise appearance. The middle image below shows Liam Dunn performing a reading from his ‘Fuckist Manifesto’, which was also a great success and brought another dimension to the evening.

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We were able to exhibit a wide selection of work in varying mediums. A lot of work went into this project, from the small details of what wine to serve to the larger tasks of making the accompanying publication. The five of us on the Relics team have had a hectic few months.

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 Perhaps we can sleep now… oh wait, there’s that Degree Show thing coming up…

relics14

 

Opening Night

‘Relics of Attachment Part I’ is an exhibition I’ve been organising with some fellow Student Curatorial Team members. It features a collection of artwork inspired by the concept of nostalgia and sentimental objects.

Tonight was the introduction to this project. There was a lot of footfall, a lot of interest, and generally a good feeling all round.

Take a look at our work.

Relics of attachment

RELICS OF ATTACHMENT PART I

A – Lucas Battich, Amsterdam Lelylaan Schiphol // Edinburgh Glasgow   

pmsrelics numbers

B – Lisa Gordon, Promises Light

C – Vivienne Russell, Five Seasons       

D – Cathy O’Brien, Empty Packages

E – Rachael Disbury, Everything I know about him

 

This project took a lot of time and planning but I feel our work is paying off. I love the buzz of all this organising. Curating ain’t so bad.

Installation

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Audience Opening Night

 

Curators
Our Team
We’re hosting a meeting tomorrow to encourage other artists to submit work for Part II of this project. The 14th of February should see a larger exhibition presented in the Cooper Gallery. So there’s really no time to relax for us!

Relics of Attachment Part I

RelicsAs part of the Student Curatorial Team at Duncan of Jordanstone, myself and a few friends have been working on an exciting new project, ‘Relics of Attachment’. There are three events involved in this project. Part I is an initial exhibition of work to be displayed on the 31st of January. This will be followed by an informative talk on the 4th of February to discuss ideas and the opportunity for other artists to get involved in submitting their work for a second exhibition at the end of February.

Here’s some info!

Get involved!

  • RELICS OF ATTACHMENT Part I
    DoJ, Matthew Building, Recess Display CabinetThursday 31st January 2013
    PREVIEW 4.30pm-6pm, Drinks & Refreshments provided
    Exhibition runs 31st January – 18th FebruaryCome to the preview of an exciting new project!
    Find out how to get your own artwork involved in Part II!!!

    Part I is a small exhibition to introduce the idea of ‘Relics of Attachment’. The nostalgic feelings we all have to personal objects and remnants. The exhibition includes a collection of items and their sentimental connection to the artists.

    \\OPEN CALL for Part II
    A larger collection of work will be displayed in the Cooper Gallery at the end of February.
    If you’re interested in participating, we are holding a meeting to discuss ideas and the opportunity to submit work at a later date.

    Come to the preview! Come to the meeting! We look forward to working with you!

    \\MEETING: 1st February
    Green Seats, Matthew Building

    \\PART II: 14th February
    Cooper Gallery

    A group project brought to you by DoJ Student Curatorial Team.

A Question

Can I preserve a banana peel?

I’m trying to. It’s an experiment. The banana itself is not overly significant. For the purposes of the task it works well though. A banana is an everyday consumable object, the peal is the trace. I want to hang onto the trace and see if it is in my power to keep something that naturally decays and fades. I want to make note of the measures I have to go to to hang onto this thing that wants to age.

I have the question. And the answer will be a process.

It’s becoming a custom for my friends/tutors/studiomates to gift my desk with their peels. It’s nice, sort of like getting mail.

 

Artrant

I’m so much better at writing, than I am at talking. Especially about my work. Give me a pen and we’ll have a wonderful conversation. Ask me to stand and explain my art to you and you’ll get a mumble and a red face. Something to work on.

Here’s some shots of how I work. That middle picture is cringey because my desk is a mess. I’m so obsessive about everything being in place. Every morning I like to go in and just arrange my collections. Those bags bellow aren’t even a piece, I just needed them to be together. Odd…

The glasses thing is still in progress but getting somewhere.

          

So yeah, there’s a Recorded Tutorial tomorrow and I’m currently trying to write a statement of my progress and intentions. Writing really helps untangle my thoughts. So far:

My work is very based around the notion of ‘obsessive sentimentality’. I enjoy taking discarded or no longer used objects and bringing them into focus, questioning why they’ve been kept and what they’re new purpose is. I find the idea of becoming attached to an object emotionally, so irational, it’s fascinating.

In previous works I have preserved used contact lenses, presented second hand dress-shirts and made multiples of a pair of binoculars from 1918. The preservation of memory and the assignation of nostalgic value to an ordinary object is a key focus. This semester I am stripping the idea back, exposing the raw process. ‘Can I preserve something that was never intended to remain intact?’

I am working with banana peels. I intend to conduct experiments to find out if/how I can keep a banana peel without it completely decaying. The question is simple, and the answer will be a process. I feel this project embodies the act of trying to hold onto something that naturally fades, like a memory, and the desperate attempts to keep a remnant.

Alongside this project, I am also doing the daily recordings of my personal basic functions; eating, sleeping, etc. This is to direct the preservation of information to data rather than objects. Recording the ordinary and mundane runnings of my life. For now this is very two-dimensional but I feel with progress it has the potential to develop into something with more form that could interact more with a viewer.

Currently I have a lot of loose objects and beginnings of concepts, I enjoy having a body of ideas to explore and a collection of artefacts surrounding me. I feel being tied to one method is stifling, yet my concepts are all somewhat connected.

I have made most progress with the piece I have been working on in the past two weeks,  with the use of my old spectacles. Again it embodies this idea of irationally maintaining something that is now of no practical use to me.

And then I ran out of steam. The rest of the night will be finishing and polishing that. Then an early start for studio fun, a nervous tutorial and an overdue return to the recycling centre. Nacht.