Opening Night

‘Relics of Attachment Part I’ is an exhibition I’ve been organising with some fellow Student Curatorial Team members. It features a collection of artwork inspired by the concept of nostalgia and sentimental objects.

Tonight was the introduction to this project. There was a lot of footfall, a lot of interest, and generally a good feeling all round.

Take a look at our work.

Relics of attachment

RELICS OF ATTACHMENT PART I

A – Lucas Battich, Amsterdam Lelylaan Schiphol // Edinburgh Glasgow   

pmsrelics numbers

B – Lisa Gordon, Promises Light

C – Vivienne Russell, Five Seasons       

D – Cathy O’Brien, Empty Packages

E – Rachael Disbury, Everything I know about him

 

This project took a lot of time and planning but I feel our work is paying off. I love the buzz of all this organising. Curating ain’t so bad.

Installation

     pmsrelics4   Installation

 

Audience Opening Night

 

Curators
Our Team
We’re hosting a meeting tomorrow to encourage other artists to submit work for Part II of this project. The 14th of February should see a larger exhibition presented in the Cooper Gallery. So there’s really no time to relax for us!

6×4″

Today started with accidentally pouring boiling water over my hands in the process of making the morning coffee. This day is very much on a knife edge. Plus side; I completed my submission for an upcoming exhibition entitled 6×4″.

The exhibition calls for the submission of artist designed postcards and will take place some time in February I think. More information when I know!

In the meantime. Hiya, here are my four 6×4 text/collages on acetate.

pc1     pc2

pc3      pc4

These kind of revert back to a style I haven’t worked in for a while. Although my work is always nostalgic and sentimental, these have that ‘older’ aesthetic I used to rely on so much. I’m glad my work has moved on, but this was a little personal piece I wanted to work on for the 6×4 exhibition.

The collages include map pages from a found second-hand atlas, doilies from a hotel I stayed at in Paris, an old photograph of my Mother’s parents, and typed repetitive phrases.

Ah where would I be without my nostalgic dreamings…?

 

Relics of Attachment Part I

RelicsAs part of the Student Curatorial Team at Duncan of Jordanstone, myself and a few friends have been working on an exciting new project, ‘Relics of Attachment’. There are three events involved in this project. Part I is an initial exhibition of work to be displayed on the 31st of January. This will be followed by an informative talk on the 4th of February to discuss ideas and the opportunity for other artists to get involved in submitting their work for a second exhibition at the end of February.

Here’s some info!

Get involved!

  • RELICS OF ATTACHMENT Part I
    DoJ, Matthew Building, Recess Display CabinetThursday 31st January 2013
    PREVIEW 4.30pm-6pm, Drinks & Refreshments provided
    Exhibition runs 31st January – 18th FebruaryCome to the preview of an exciting new project!
    Find out how to get your own artwork involved in Part II!!!

    Part I is a small exhibition to introduce the idea of ‘Relics of Attachment’. The nostalgic feelings we all have to personal objects and remnants. The exhibition includes a collection of items and their sentimental connection to the artists.

    \\OPEN CALL for Part II
    A larger collection of work will be displayed in the Cooper Gallery at the end of February.
    If you’re interested in participating, we are holding a meeting to discuss ideas and the opportunity to submit work at a later date.

    Come to the preview! Come to the meeting! We look forward to working with you!

    \\MEETING: 1st February
    Green Seats, Matthew Building

    \\PART II: 14th February
    Cooper Gallery

    A group project brought to you by DoJ Student Curatorial Team.

Dissertation Done

The 14th of January has come and gone. I never imagined a life after this date. And here I am.

And here it is.

I ended up enjoying writing it… I think. I like writing in general. And it has kind of motivated me in the area of practical work too. There’s so much going on this year already. Expect lengthy blogs.

The Christmas holidays were a little bit anticlimactic. I spent my weeks off either working, ill in bed with flu, or writing the dissertation. However, I managed to get my annual painting done. A great benefit of being a creative person at Christmas is that even when you’re skint, there’s gift ideas.

And now Christmas is done, and I’m into my final semester at Duncan of Jordanstone.

So 2013, lets have you.

Everything I’m Thinking Right Now

We were required to do a presentation of our work this week, complete with slides and talking within a lecture theatre. As nerve wracking as this was, it got me to think about the keys points of my work. I want to write these down and have them there to reflect on if ever I get lost in it. So I have.

 

 

My work surrounds ideas of ‘Obsessive Sentimentality’. To give context to this, a personal anecdote is required. Two years ago I took a trip to Paris and indulged in all the wonderful cliches of the place, running around with a beret for a week (go on, judge me). When I came back from Paris it was time to ditch my monthly contact lenses and change them for a fresh pair. I couldn’t. It’s this irrational attachment to a useless object that fascinates me. By disposing of those contact lenses, I’d have felt like I was losing something.

I’ve gone even further back this year, focusing on a collection of old specs. I’ve worn glasses since the age of six, so this is seven years worth.

 

Although the objects are personal objects, and I myself have these notions of nostalgia I’m discussing, the work is not intended as confessional. An idea is what I’m trying to express. The glasses have become something new. Their intended purpose is void. With the repeated image on the backboard in this glasses piece, a postcard picture meaning nothing to me but repeated hundreds of times, I am communicating that these glasses no longer see anything new, they are irrelevant in this respect. Their new purpose is simply to be kept. Someone has preserved these and given them importance. They are shells, and quite useless.

A good artist to reference at this point would be Sophie Calle.   http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/art-now-sophie-calle

With every passing year, Calle throws a birthday party inviting a number of guests, as customary they bring gifts for her. Instead of using these gifts for their individual conventional purposes, she would box them up and keep them, eventually displaying them in a cabinet. Calle made the decision that the purpose or use of these gifts was not important, it was the attachment and the idea of the ‘gift’ that was important to her. She assigned nostalgic feelings of appreciation and gratitude in each and by displaying them was able to look at them as such, rather than using them.

The presentation is key in this example and in my own work. There is a permanence in encapsulating something. When an object is preserved and framed in the confines of a box, it becomes important and provokes observation and interest. I am constantly framing, making box structures and displaying pieces while continually trying to keep the look clean and uncluttered. The stage of the frame assists the objects, emphasising the idea that they have been assigned a significant not originally intended for them.

 

Similarly, text is a necessary component in my work. The use of titles, explanatory paragraphs and longer spiels of writing is an enjoyable aspect of my practise. I find myself getting obsessed with phrases, the same way I become attached to an object, I get attached to words and repeat them over and over. I sit on my studio floor and typetypetype, annoying studio mates with the pounding of my sentences. This gives a more active representation of the obsessive nature of this sentimentality. A phrase that has been in my head for a while is ‘Now is the time for all good men to come to the aid of the party.’ I love this because the words mean nothing. However it is an old typing exercise and so is remembered and has a significant purpose for so many people, and yet the content of the sentence itself is irrelevant. This echoes the idea of the object becoming a shell for ones own ideas to be projected on, rather than used for its original intention.

Often the work is quite ambiguous in appearance. I find titling helps provide more of a context. For example in my previous work with contact lenses, I had a cabinet of 84 bottles, some with lenses in them, and the title at the bottom read Everything I’ve Ever Seen, 2006 – 2011. This allows for a more interactive experience with the viewer. They see the piece and consider its meaning, they read the text and connect the ideas of sight with the bottles of lenses. They consider it for themselves. I strive for simplicity in the work while trying to maintain the ability to communicate ideas without being overbearing.

My current project continue these values and take them further. Rather than replying on the use of old object, which if overdone can definitely start to look kitsch, I have stripped back my concept to focus on the raw idea of this need to maintain something that has become useless. I am preserving banana peels

 

The bananas themselves are not important, it is the physical process and experimentation I am undertaking, the actions of maintaining an object that naturally has to decay. And I am liking the results. I am left with a collection of these funny shrivelled objects. And like the glasses project I am showing how they have changed and lost purpose. The difference with the bananas to the other objects I have worked with is that the change in then is physically apparent. They are no longer yellow, they are physically completely different to their starting point. This allows the concept to be clearer and more easily communicated than in my previous works.

Taking this further still, this semester I have been continuously collecting data. I have been recording my daily basic functions, and plan to develop this over the Christmas break (providing the dissertation doesn’t kill me). Although I still feel strongly about the work being 3 Dimensional and installation based, I won’t rule out the use of sound in this piece. Stay tuned for that one.

Frenetic

‘Frenetic’ is my new favourite word. I’ve been slipping it into conversations at intervals over the last couple of weeks and wondering if people actually know what I’m talking about.

FRE·NET·IC/FRƏˈNETIK/

Adjective:
Fast and energetic in a rather wild and uncontrolled way: “a frenetic pace of activity”.

I couldn’t sleep a couple of weeks ago. This isn’t uncommon for me, but there was one particularly awful Saturday night. I found myself awake at 4am knowing I wasn’t going to be granted any dream time. I got my project book out with the intention to make some more unrealistic to do lists or another elaborate sketch of a farfetched idea. Instead I started writing. Just writing. No stop for consideration, just impulsive words on paper. Mostly the same phrase over and over, with some sporadic moments of varied expression.

When Monday showed its face, I still had this phrase in my head. And the typewriter came out. Brilliant. Sitting on the floor of the studio with black coffee and pounding keys is good therapy. And you can sometimes make some art out of it.

 

Perhaps the writing is a physical representation of my overactive mind. Thoughts go round and round, every event gets analysed and scrutinised in detail.

I don’t like obviously confessional art. I don’t wish to submit a diary entry. Thats too easy for people to just get facts and nothing else. I like the ambiguity of the frenetic typing. I don’t want to tell you a story, but I want you to wonder what the story is about. I’m still expressing thoughts and relaying events personal to me, you maybe just don’t have a clue what I’m on about. And I like that.

I spieled for a good 48cm last week resulting in, ‘On Wednesday the 7th of November’, an object/text combination piece, I don’t really want to explain that one.

 

A Question

Can I preserve a banana peel?

I’m trying to. It’s an experiment. The banana itself is not overly significant. For the purposes of the task it works well though. A banana is an everyday consumable object, the peal is the trace. I want to hang onto the trace and see if it is in my power to keep something that naturally decays and fades. I want to make note of the measures I have to go to to hang onto this thing that wants to age.

I have the question. And the answer will be a process.

It’s becoming a custom for my friends/tutors/studiomates to gift my desk with their peels. It’s nice, sort of like getting mail.

 

Artrant

I’m so much better at writing, than I am at talking. Especially about my work. Give me a pen and we’ll have a wonderful conversation. Ask me to stand and explain my art to you and you’ll get a mumble and a red face. Something to work on.

Here’s some shots of how I work. That middle picture is cringey because my desk is a mess. I’m so obsessive about everything being in place. Every morning I like to go in and just arrange my collections. Those bags bellow aren’t even a piece, I just needed them to be together. Odd…

The glasses thing is still in progress but getting somewhere.

          

So yeah, there’s a Recorded Tutorial tomorrow and I’m currently trying to write a statement of my progress and intentions. Writing really helps untangle my thoughts. So far:

My work is very based around the notion of ‘obsessive sentimentality’. I enjoy taking discarded or no longer used objects and bringing them into focus, questioning why they’ve been kept and what they’re new purpose is. I find the idea of becoming attached to an object emotionally, so irational, it’s fascinating.

In previous works I have preserved used contact lenses, presented second hand dress-shirts and made multiples of a pair of binoculars from 1918. The preservation of memory and the assignation of nostalgic value to an ordinary object is a key focus. This semester I am stripping the idea back, exposing the raw process. ‘Can I preserve something that was never intended to remain intact?’

I am working with banana peels. I intend to conduct experiments to find out if/how I can keep a banana peel without it completely decaying. The question is simple, and the answer will be a process. I feel this project embodies the act of trying to hold onto something that naturally fades, like a memory, and the desperate attempts to keep a remnant.

Alongside this project, I am also doing the daily recordings of my personal basic functions; eating, sleeping, etc. This is to direct the preservation of information to data rather than objects. Recording the ordinary and mundane runnings of my life. For now this is very two-dimensional but I feel with progress it has the potential to develop into something with more form that could interact more with a viewer.

Currently I have a lot of loose objects and beginnings of concepts, I enjoy having a body of ideas to explore and a collection of artefacts surrounding me. I feel being tied to one method is stifling, yet my concepts are all somewhat connected.

I have made most progress with the piece I have been working on in the past two weeks,  with the use of my old spectacles. Again it embodies this idea of irationally maintaining something that is now of no practical use to me.

And then I ran out of steam. The rest of the night will be finishing and polishing that. Then an early start for studio fun, a nervous tutorial and an overdue return to the recycling centre. Nacht.